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Street Art

The global ambitions of Invader’s street art.

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Source: The New Yorker

The ground was squelchy, leading the mind to wonder what sort of organic matter was decomposing underfoot. A topsoil of potato-chip bags and soda cans disturbed the silence that Invader and his accomplice, Mr. Blue, were trying to preserve. It was 1:03 a.m. on a Wednesday in mid-July. They had parked their van nearby, and were picking their way down an overgrown service path that led to a sliver of land alongside the A4 highway, just past the eastern limit of Paris.

“Flatten yourself against the wall if a car comes,” Invader told me.

Read more: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2023/12/18/invader-artist-profile

Street Art

Banksy’s Seaside Masterpiece Hits the Market: A Glimpse into the Fate of the World’s Largest Street Art

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Source: bnn

In the quaint town of Lowestoft, Norfolk, an extraordinary piece of art history is preparing to change hands. Created by the enigmatic street artist Banksy, the largest artwork ever conceived by this clandestine figure has been stirring both admiration and debate. Painted on a serene August day in 2021, a mural depicting a seagull’s whimsical interaction with a refuse skip has transcended its initial allure, becoming a beacon of cultural significance and now, a coveted asset expected to command millions.

The Journey from Public Exhibition to Private Sale

The artwork, a pivotal element of Banksy’s ‘Great British Spraycation,’ was not just a visual spectacle but a narrative woven into the fabric of Lowestoft. Weighing over 11.5 tonnes and split into two segments, the piece’s fate took a dramatic turn when structural damage to its host building necessitated a complex removal. Safeguarded in storage since its detachment, the mural’s impending sale, managed through a dedicated website, has ignited discussions far beyond the art world. With an estimated value eclipsing the initial £3 million anticipation, the sale underscores Banksy’s profound impact on the art market and the communities graced by his work.

Read more: https://bnnbreaking.com/world/uk/banksys-seaside-masterpiece-hits-the-market-a-glimpse-into-the-fate-of-the-worlds-largest-street-art

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Street Art

EXHIBITION: STREET ART

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Source: Dawn

The spacious, tree-lined grounds of Port Grand in Karachi became an open-air gallery for ‘Galiyon Ke Rang’, a street art festival conceived and curated by the irrepressible Pomme Amina Gohar. The awami [local] character of street art sets it apart from art displayed in the formal environment of the enclosed gallery space.

There is an implicit trust between the viewing public and the exhibiting artists to engage with the artwork in good faith, as there are no protective barriers to guard street art. This direct interchange between artist and public allows for raucous artwork to co-exist with the restrained, enabling a lively and wildly eclectic mix of artistic outcomes. This dynamic was strategically deployed by the multifaceted design of the four-day festival.

Read more: https://www.dawn.com/news/1810580

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Street Art

How the Cabbagetown community became friendly to street art

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Source: The Atlanta Journal Constitution

This story was originally published by ArtsATL.

Cabbagetown, according to local folklore, got its name when a Model T truck loaded with cabbages overturned. The residents helped themselves to the newly liberated vegetables, and the smell of cabbages cooking permeated the community for weeks.

Following the Civil War, German Jewish immigrant Jacob Elsas opened the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills here. Houses built for the mill’s workers have today become private homes, but, before the district became gentrified, Cabbagetown was a thriving home to artists and musicians.

Read more: https://www.ajc.com/things-to-do/how-the-cabbagetown-community-became-friendly-to-street-art/OMOY3INJOZGCRPKBNZK3KFJ6SE/

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