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Art World

The Art World Before and After Thelma Golden

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Source: The New Yorker

More than seven hundred people came to the black-tie gala for the Studio Museum in Harlem last October. It was gala season, a time when, on an almost nightly basis, cultural institutions around the city congratulate themselves and raise money doing it, and this one draws the liveliest, the best-dressed, and by far the most diverse crowd of celebrants. Thelma Golden, the museum’s director, seemed to be everywhere at once as she moved around the room welcoming Spike Lee, Nicole Ari Parker, Questlove, Julie Mehretu, David Byrne, and many more. Golden, who is fifty-eight and five feet tall, with close-cropped hair and surprisingly large eyes, was wearing a long, sparkly dress. In this world, at least, she is one of those people who, like Elvis and Oprah, do not require a last name. “Thelma is the consummate New Yorker,” her friend Elizabeth Alexander, the president of the Mellon Foundation and the evening’s honoree, told me. “She can talk to anybody, and she’s hilarious in a New York way—precise, unpredictable, irreverent, keen, clickety-clack.”

Read more: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2024/02/12/the-art-world-before-and-after-thelma-golden

Art World

What Is the Status of Class in the Art World?

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Source: Ocula

This summer, a new initiative to empower the art world’s working class is emerging. Working Arts Club, a networking group for art professionals from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, will officially launch on 16 July.

‘Starting Working Arts Club had been on my mind for some time, but it took a while to gain the confidence to put it out there. As seems typical of people from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, I felt worried about being judged,’ said Meg Molloy, WAC’s founder and Head of Communications at Stephen Friedman Gallery.

Read more: https://ocula.com/magazine/art-news/what-is-the-status-of-class-in-the-art-world/

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Art Walk

Can Tokyo Gendai’s Sophomore Edition Build on Japan’s Art World Momentum?

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Source: Artsy.net

As its VIP preview wraps up today, hopes are high for Tokyo Gendai’s sophomore edition. The fair, which runs through July 7th at PACIFICO Yokohama, aims to build on the momentum established by a strong first outing last year, which arrived after some five years in the making. This year’s fair features 70 galleries (compared to 73 last year) from 20 countries—including the U.S., South Korea, France, Germany, Spain, and the U.K., besides Japan—alongside an expanded public program with talks, satellite events, and youth workshops.

Tokyo Gendai—dubbed the first truly international contemporary art fair in Japan—was co-founded by founding director of Art Basel Hong Kong and its predecessor ART HK Magnus Renfrew, under the umbrella art organization, The Art Assembly, which also runs other fairs ART SG in Singapore and Taipei Dangdai in Taiwan. More than demonstrating a comprehensive discourse between Japan and other parts of Asia, and beyond, the Gendai aims to reinstate Tokyo as a leading global art hub, while naturally reigniting and interconnecting the local Tokyo gallery scene.

Read more: https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-tokyo-gendais-sophomore-edition-build-japans-art-momentum

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Art World

How is AI shaping culture in the art world?

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Source: GZERO

In this episode of GZERO AI, Taylor Owen, host of the Machines Like Us podcast, recounts his conversation with media theorist Douglas Rushkoff about the cultural implications of the ongoing AI revolution, which raised a couple of questions: Will AI enhance cultural production, similar to Auto-Tune and Photoshop, or produce art that truly moves society. Will people even care about its role in cultural production? However, Owen notes that current AI-generated content often lacks the cultural depth that our art and culture demand.

So, I recently had a wonderful conversation with the media theorist Douglas Rushkoff about what this current moment in AI means for our culture.

For the past 30 years, Rushkoff has been chronicling the relationship between emerging technologies and the response of our cultural production. And in our conversation, he referenced a really wonderful Neil Postman observation. Neil Postman, the great media theorist who came up with the idea of “amusing ourselves to death.” When Postman was asked to describe what media is, he said, “That media is a medium in which culture grows. It’s the Petri dish in which we develop culture as a society.” It’s a wonderful metaphor, and that left me wondering: if a medium is the thing in which culture grows, what kind of culture is growing from AI?

Read more: https://www.gzeromedia.com/gzero-ai/gzero-ai-video/how-is-ai-shaping-culture-in-the-art-world

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